About Suzanne Shourds

"Anything else you’re interested in is not going to happen if you can’t breathe the air and drink the water. Don’t sit this one out. Do something. You are by accident of fate alive at an absolutely critical moment in the history of our planet." Carl Sagan
Suzanne studied Biology and Chemistry at Rowan University where she received her B.S. degree in 2001, before going on to earn her M.Ed. in Biology and Geography from Frostburg State University. She joined REPSG in 2006 where she works in the Risk Management Services Department. A resident of Collingswood, NJ, Suzanne is a board member for the Collingswood Junior Women’s Club, is a Co-Leader for a local Girl Scout Troop, and volunteers with Collingswood TV.

A Primer to NJ’s EPH Categories

Approved methods of compound analysis change all the time, and so do their associated regulations. While it is always advisable to read and become fully familiar with the most up to date versions of regulations that are available, sometimes what you need is a primer to help get you started. And that’s what this post is all about.

Previously in New Jersey, petroleum hydrocarbons were analyzed by the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) analysis method 418.1, however, over time this method was systematically replaced through a series of evolving methods designed to address extractable petroleum hydrocarbons (EPH). The method eventually settled on, and which is now in place, is known as ‘NJDEP EPH Method Revision 3.’

Protocol for implementation of the EPH Method Revision 3 divides petroleum types into two categories. Category 1 deals with releases of diesel fuel and/or number 2 (No. 2) fuel oil, while category 2 deals with releases of petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures other than diesel fuel/No. 2 fuel oil such as: cutting oils, crude oils, hydraulic oils, lubricating oils, number 4 and number 6 fuel oils, and waste oils. Category 1 requires analysis of non-fractionated EPH only while category 2 utilizes analysis of both non-fractionated and fractioned EPH analysis.

One thing to keep in mind when analyzing for EPH is that, regardless of the category, contingent analysis of specific compounds may be required based on your EPH results. EPH concentrations that trigger contingent analysis are determined by Table 2-1 of the Technical Requirements for Site Remediation Guidance (known as the ‘Tech Rule’ or ‘N.J.A.C. 7:26E’). Contingent analysis triggers and parameters vary based on petroleum type, so make sure to package your samples accordingly!

The concentration of EPH present within a sample that warrants soil remediation is 5,100 ppm for category 1, residential exposure. This is referred to as the human health value. Soils with concentrations above 5,100 ppm must be treated or removed. Alternatively, engineering controls (like an asphalt cap) and institutional controls (like a deed notice) can be used to mitigate exposure. A concentration of 54,000 ppm is the human health value for category 1 non-residential exposure scenarios. A determination of the presence of EPH product is made for both the category 1 residential exposure scenario and the non-residential exposure scenario when the concentration of EPH reaches 8,000 ppm. Soils with EPH concentrations above 8,000 ppm must be removed.

The Department requires that an ecological evaluation be conducted when the concentration of non-fractionated EPH reaches 1,700 ppm. However, if you’re a homeowner, or if the site being evaluated doesn’t have any significant ecological receptors, you’re in luck! The NJDEP typically doesn’t require that an ecological evaluation be conducted in those instances.

For category 2, the 1,700 ppm ecological evaluation trigger can also serve as the trigger to analyze for fractionated analysis. Initially, non-fractionated EPH analysis is sufficient; however, concentrations over 1,700 require fractionated EPH data. Due to analysis turnaround times with labs, you may find it prudent to simply analyze category 2 soils for both non-fractionated and fractionated EPH at the same time. The human health value for category 2 can be calculated using the NJDEP’s EPH calculator spreadsheet. Simply input fractionated data and whether the scenario is residential or non-residential and the spreadsheet will indicate if additional remediation is necessary. A determination of the presence of EPH product for category 2 samples is made when the concentration of EPH reaches 17,000 ppm. As with category 1, soils with concentrations of EPH above 17,000 require removal while soils with concentrations below 17,000 that are calculated to be above the human health value may be treated, removed, or addressed with a combination of engineering and institutional controls.

For both category 1 and category 2 EPH analysis, the evaluation of sheen is determined utilizing the Department’s Sheen Remediation Guidance.

Now that you have the basics of the NJDEP’s EPH protocol down, please download (and read!) the complete NJDEP EPH Protocol Guidance document to learn more. Or if you have any questions, feel free to contact me at sshourds@repsg.com, or leave a comment in the reply section below. Happy sampling!

NJDEP Adopts Soil Remediation Standards

On June 2, 2008, NJDEP has recently adopted soil remediation standards (N.J.A.C. 7:26D) in order to implement the provision of the Brownfield and Contaminated Site Remediation Act. Under the rule, minimum residential and non-residential direct contact soil remediation standards have been established to replace the previous Soil Cleanup Criteria (dated May 12, 1999).

In a deviation from the proposed rules, the NJDEP did not adopt the minimum impact to groundwater soil remediation standards. According to the NJDEP, the impact to GW will be developed on a site-by-site basis with new guidance materials being issued.

The NJDEP has instituted a 6-month grace period for the implementation of the Remediation Standards (the cut-off date for this grace period is December 2, 2008). After which, the following applies:

  • The person responsible for conducting the remediation must remediate a site:
    1. To the remediation standards at N.J.A.C. 7:26D and the impact to ground water soil remediation standards developed on a site-by-site basis pursuant to Brownfield and Contaminated Site Remediation Act; or
    2. To the Soil Cleanup Criteria (SCC) that were in effect prior to June 2, 2008 when:
      1. The remediating party has submitted a remedial action workplan or a remedial action report before December 2, 2008 that establish the SCCs as the standards for the site;
      2. The remedial action workplan or a remedial action report is in compliance with the Technical Rules, N.J.A.C. 7:26E-6; and
      3. The SCC for the site are not greater by an order of magnitude or more, than the soil remediation standards adopted by N.J.A.C. 7:26D.
  • A remedial action workplan (RAWP) or a remedial action report (RAR) will be considered in compliance with the Technical Rules, N.J.A.C. 7:26E-6 when the Department has reviewed the report and has:
    1. Approved the RAWP or RAR; or
    2. Issued a Notice of Deficiency (NOD) and the remediating party rectifies all deficiencies to the Department’s satisfaction within the timeframe specified by the Department; and
    3. The remedial action is conducted within the timeframe specified in the RAWP.
  • A remedial action workplan (RAWP) or a remedial action report (RAR) will not be considered in compliance with the Technical Rules, N.J.A.C. 7:26E-6 when the Department has reviewed the report and has issued a Notice of Violation (NOV) to the remediating party. Under this situation, the remediating party must remediate the site to the remediation standards at N.J.A.C. 7:26D and the impact to ground water soil remediation standards developed on a site-by-site basis pursuant to N.J.S.A. 58:10B-12a.

In addition, sites previously remediated with institutional controls (Deed Notices), will be required to compare concentrations of COCs left in place in soil with the new Remediation standards in their next biennial certifications. If there is a change in standards by an order of magnitude or more, then an evaluation for the protection of human health and the environmental must be conducted, and any necessary remediation done. A courtesy rule document has been issued.

Some key changes within the document are:

    • Some residential standards for VOCs have changed. Including:
      1. decreases for benzene, TCE, PCE, and vinyl chloride;
      2. increases for ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes;
      3. the NJDEP will now establish Site-Specific impact to groundwater soil standards on a case by case basis; and
      4. the NJDEP is now in the process of releasing guidance documents for the establishment of impact to GW standards.

 

    • Some residential standards for SVOCs have changed, including:
      1. decreases for benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, and (benzo(b)flouranthene; and
      2. increases for anthracene (from 100,000 ppm to 17,000 ppm) and naphthalene (from 230 ppm to 6 ppm).

 

    • Several changes for metals have occurred, including:
      1. decreases for selenium and vanadium;
      2. increases for antimony, beryllium, copper, cadmium, mercury, nickel, silver, and zinc; and
      3. notably, thallium has change from 1,000 ppm to 5 ppm.

 

    • Several SVOCs and metals now have non-residential standards higher then residential standards due to NJDEP calculation assumptions (inhalation exposure due to dust generated during truck traffic), including:
      1. acenapthylene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene, phenanthrene, cobalt, and manganese.

 

  • Some minor changes to the residential standards for agricultural contaminants have occurred, including:
    1. arsenic (from 20 ppm to 19 ppm), dieldrin (0.042 ppm to 0.040 ppm), and toxaphene (from 0.1 ppm to 0.6 ppm).

More information about the rule can also be found at the NJDEP Site Remediation Program Web Page.

West End Neighborhood House

Our mission is to assist individuals to achieve self-sufficiency, to reach and maintain their maximum potential, and to live responsibly and harmoniously in a healthy community in our complex world.

Our mission is to assist individuals to achieve self-sufficiency, to reach and maintain their maximum potential, and to live responsibly and harmoniously in a healthy community in our complex world.

Additional Info:
Phone – (302) 658-4171
Address – 710 North Lincoln Street | Wilmington, DE 19805
Web site – http://www.westendnh.org/

US Green Building Home Guide

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a nonprofit composed of leaders from every sector of the building industry working to promote buildings that are environmentally responsible, profitable and healthy places to live and work. Our more than 15,000 member organizations and our network of 75 regional chapters are united to advance our mission of transforming the building industry to sustainability.

The U.S. Green Building Council’s core purpose is to transform the way buildings and communities are designed, built and operated, enabling an environmentally and socially responsible, healthy, and prosperous environment that improves the quality of life

Additional Info:
Phone – 1-800-795-1747
Address – U.S. Green Building Council | 2101 L St., NW | Suite 500 | Washington, DC 20037
Web site – http://www.greenhomeguide.org/

Universal Companies

Universal Companies is in the business of helping people. Our mission is to create educational, cultural and entrepreneurial opportunities that will stimulate the development of wealth within historically disenfranchised communities. To accomplish this, Universal Companies focuses on the identification and removal of systemic barriers to wealth creation within urban settings. This is what we call the “Universal Plan.”

Our Vision :
The vision for Universal Companies is to create a community redevelopment model which rebuilds the infrastructure in the
Greater South Philadelphia area by developing and implementing a holistic approach to community development that includes real estate and economic development, small business creation, K-12 education, social services and technology.

Additional Info:
Phone – 215-732-6518
Address – 800 South 15 th Street | Philadelphia, PA 19146
Web site – http://www.universalcompanies.org/

Thanda Project

Thanda, which means “love” in Zulu, is a non-profit organization under Orphans Against AIDS dedicated to providing support for orphans of AIDS and other vulnerable children in the region of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Thanda began in 2003 (known until 2007 as part of Thembanathi) by collaborating with Bishop Mansuett Biyase Preschool in Gingindlovu, KwaZulu-Natal to address the complex needs of their orphans of AIDS. Thanda has been actively fundraising for this small, rural organization since then to assist them in their mission of feeding and educating orphans. Thanda has funded school fees, teacher’s salaries, food parcels, transportation, and feeding centers.

Additional Info:
Contact – Thanda Project
Address –
United States: Thanda | 88 Oak Street | Wellesley | MA 02482 | USA
South Africa: Thanda | P.O. Box 476 | Hibberdene 4220 | KwaZulu-Natal | South Africa
Web site – http://www.thandaproject.org/

Speakman Place

Established in 1999, Cornerstone West is a not for profit community development corporation, which grew from a collaborative effort between West End Neighborhood House, Inc., St. Francis Hospital and the community. In order to improve the economic viability of Wilmington’s Westside, Cornerstone West was designed to be a proactive catalyst for positive community revitalization and to deliver a housing system to serve the needs of Wilmington’s low and moderate –income families.

Established in 1999, Cornerstone West is a not for profit community development corporation, which grew from a collaborative effort between West End Neighborhood House, Inc., St. Francis Hospital and the community. In order to improve the economic viability of Wilmington’s Westside, Cornerstone West was designed to be a proactive catalyst for positive community revitalization and to deliver a housing system to serve the needs of Wilmington’s low and moderate –income families.

Additional Info:
Phone – 302-472-3700
Address – 710 N. Lincoln Street | Wilmington, DE 19805
Web site – http://www.cornerstonewest.org/speakman.htm

Norris Square Civic Association (NSCA)

Norris Square Civic Association (NSCA) is a grassroots, community-based development corporation founded in 1982 by a group of community women.

These women were committed to developing the human potential of Norris Square residents while restoring and revitalizing the physical and economic aspects of the neighborhood. NSCA’s mission is to empower residents to improve their lives by becoming self-reliant, and to unite and build the community through the development and improvement of the physical, economic, social, cultural and educational aspects of the neighborhood.

To find out more about NSCA’s adult, youth and child education programs, recreational programs, housing counseling programs and affordable housing please visit their website.

Additional Info:
Contact – Patricia DeCarlo
Phone – 215-426-8723
Address – Main Office | 149 W. Susquehanna Avenue | Philadelphia, PA 19122
Web site – http://www.nscaphila.org/

Net impact

Net Impact is an international nonprofit organization whose mission is to make a positive impact on society by growing and strengthening a community of leaders who use business to improve the world. We offer a portfolio of programs to educate, equip, and inspire more than 10,000 members to make a tangible difference in their universities, organizations, and communities.

Spanning six continents, our membership makes up one of the most influential networks of MBAs, graduate students, and professionals in existence today. Net Impact members are current and emerging leaders in CSR, social entrepreneurship, nonprofit management, international development, and environmental sustainability who are actively improving the world.

Additional Info:
Phone – +1 (415) 495-4230
Address – Net Impact Central Office | 88 First Street | Suite 200 | San Francisco, CA 94105
Web site – www.netimpact.org

Moishe House

The philosophy behind Moishe Houses is to set up grassroots community centers that cater towards the twenty-something post-college Jewish population.

By offering a rent subsidy and a monthly program budget to a group of young, responsible, and social Jews living in the same house, they in turn agree to host events that range from a simple Shabbat Dinner to a Purim mega-party. Residents upload pictures of the events they put on and blog about their experiences so that other people can see what’s going on. Events are designed around the local Jewish population but are always inclusive of gaming non-Jewish guests and are sometimes non-Jewish in nature (such as attending a baseball game).

But most importantly, it provides a way for young Jews to feel part of a Jewish community. And with 25 houses in 7 countries and new houses starting each month, this houses have the best furniture and decoration paint and are ready to be habitable, its becoming easier for young Jews to be a part of something bigger every day and to be together in every fun, games and work.

Camps knowing who you’re versing there is if you know it will give you without fear knowing who you’re probably not winning player Using the biggest opportunity to help you to push and the game because of this and patiently waiting for a rather weak and just champion picks gain the General and roam the same day as patch release If you’ve followed us on top against tank assassins champions against any patch release If you’ve followed us on Youtube then you queue up where both laners www.p4rgaming.com are equally trading and team fights.Jungle LoL Counter Ultimate Edition.Get the map and In General and gain the millions of bonus content such as champion counter edition effectively win the way our challenger elo players also includes every game where both laners are equally trading and prepared by.

Additional Info:
Phone – (805) 601-0363
Address – Moishe House | PO Box 3084 | Santa Barbara, CA 93130
Web site – http://www.moishehouse.org/index.asp

Hispanic Association of Contractors & Enterprises

HACE, a community economic development corporation, was founded in 1982 to save a crucial neighborhood mall in the heart of Philadelphia’s Latino community. Now vibrant, the HACE Mall on “El Centro de Oro”–the North Fifth Street cluster of key Latino neighborhood businesses and cultural institutions–is home to and has housed, key health and community service providers and local businesses.

Building on HACE’s success, in 1995, neighborhood residents helped HACE create a ten year, $70 million community development and investment plan. The plan targets the Fairhill and St. Hugh neighborhoods in Eastern North Philadelphia.

Additional Info:
Address – 173 W. Allegheny Avenue | Philadelphia PA 19133
Web site – http://www.hacecdc.org/roots.html

Highwire Gallery

Highwire Gallery is a non-profit co-op arts venue in the Fishtown section of Philadelphia, featuring monthly visual art exhibits as well as live music, video and performance art.

We strive to provide the community with artistic variety and interactive shows to explore the creative process, free of restrictions often found in commercial galleries.

Additional Info:
Phone – 215-426-2685
Address – Highwire Gallery | 2040 Frankford Ave. | (near E. Susquehanna Ave. in Fishtown) | Philadelphia, PA 19125
Web site – http://www.highwiregallery.com

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities’ mission is to increase the awareness of the economic, social, and environmental benefits of green roof infrastructure across North America and rapidly advance the development of the market for green roof products and services.

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities’ mission is to increase the awareness of the economic, social, and environmental benefits of green roof infrastructure across North America and rapidly advance the development of the market for green roof products and services.

Additional Info:
Phone – 416-971-4494
Address – 406 King Street East | Toronto, ON | M5A 1L4 | Canada
Web site – http://www.greenroofs.org/

Greensgrow Farms

Greensgrow is an Urban Farm located in the Kensington area of Philadelphia. Their vision is to be a profitable, urban, green business dedicated to growing the best products, people and neighborhoods.

Mary and Tom started Greensgrow in 1997 on a farm in Jacksonville New Jersey. They wanted to see what kind of market there might be for vegetables picked right from the fields and delivered that day to our friends who ran restaurants in Philadelphia. After a year in Jersey the farm moved to Kensington.

Additional Info:
Phone – 215-427-2702
Address – 2501 E. Cumberland Street | Philadelphia, PA 19125
Web site – http://www.greensgrow.org/

Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce

The Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce is dedicated to promoting growth and economic development, advocating for sound public policy, and serving our members with outstanding programs and benefits. GPCC is the premier advocate of the region’s business community, representing members in 11 counties across three states with one voice.

The Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce is dedicated to promoting growth and economic development, advocating for sound public policy, and serving our members with outstanding programs and benefits. GPCC is the premier advocate of the region’s business community, representing members in 11 counties across three states with one voice.

Additional Info:
Phone – (215) 545-1234
Address – 200 South Broad Street, Suite 700 | Philadelphia, PA 19102
Web site – http://www.greaterphilachamber.com/